Independent Pharmacies


General Discussion Forgotten Chicago Forum
Explore Forgotten Chicago
Feel free to discuss anything related to the website here. 
Pages: 1234Next
Current Page: 1 of 4
Independent Pharmacies
Posted by: Kchi (---.dsl.chcgil.ameritech.net)
Date: August 09, 2011 03:26PM

Another piece of forgotten Chicago are all the old independent pharmacies that were found in the neighborhoods. Nowdays most are gone replaced by Walgreen's and CVS stores. In the 60's I still remember the pharmacist at times still mixing medicines as opposed to today's pharmacies where the majority of prescriptions come in boxes or the pharmacist basically count pills and the instructions are printed by a computer.

In the old days when people did not have health insurance, the neighborhood pharmacist became the only source of medical care prior to going to a doctor as a last resort.

As a kid, I was fascinated by a closed store front, where when you peeked in the window you saw the old pharmacy counter. This was strictly pharmacy only, nothing else. The story my parents told, was that the pharmacist way back when was a doctor in the old country but because of the language barrier and different qualifications could not practice medicine but could become a pharmacist.
The other benefit to these types of pharmacies were that way before 24 hour pharmacies most of the pharmacists lived in the neighborhood and could be contacted after hours.

I also remember years ago seeing a nnumber of old blue and orange Rexall signs. My understanding was that these were not company owned stores but were either franchises or similar ti True Value or a Certified or Centella where the owner was a member of an association of some type to group together and buy their inventory from Rexall.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 08/09/2011 03:29PM by Kchi.

Options: ReplyQuote

AD:

Re: Independent Pharmacies
Posted by: Richard Stachowski (---.dsl.chcgil.sbcglobal.net)
Date: August 10, 2011 09:09PM

[b]Yes we had a drug store every few blocks in the Back of the Yards. Most of these drug stores as we called them had a soda fountain where you can get a milk shake or a fountain coke. Yes I Remember them well.[/b]



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 08/10/2011 09:10PM by Richard Stachowski.

Options: ReplyQuote

AD:

Re: Independent Pharmacies
Posted by: 222psm (---.br.br.cox.net)
Date: August 11, 2011 10:12AM

Our local drug store was Black's on the south west corner of Montrose and Sacramento and there was a 2nd one on the south east corner of Montrose and Albany, I can't remember its name.



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 08/11/2011 10:14AM by 222psm.

Options: ReplyQuote

AD:

Re: Independent Pharmacies
Posted by: BTRIPP (---.dsl.chcgil.sbcglobal.net)
Date: August 11, 2011 10:36AM

Back when I was a kid we had two at the corner of Clark & Fullerton. Parkway had been there for ages (and had a soda fountain back in the 60's) on the SW corner, and then there was Sol's Pharmacy on the SE corner. My first ever job was at Sol's back around 8th grade, when I put by budding OCD to use as a stockboy!

Options: ReplyQuote

AD:

Re: Independent Pharmacies
Posted by: Mornac (---.dsl.chcgil.sbcglobal.net)
Date: August 12, 2011 01:45PM

When I was a freshman in high school (’73) I worked for several months at LaManna’s Drugs at Damen and Berwyn. It was rapidly dying breed of independent places. Joe LaManna was the owner/pharmacist and still ran the place until it closed (probably about 1975). The place was so old that I’d like to say that he inherited it from his family, but Joe was an immigrant himself so it’s possible that he brought the place at some point (perhaps from his employer) . You could tell the place had a glorious past but suffered from growing anachronism probably starting around the end of the war. There was a pressed tin ceiling and a couple of those old phone booths with a fan that went on when you closed the door and a tiny bench to sit on. We had a fountain, and although the fare was obviously stripped down from what it once had been, I did learn how to make milk shakes on one of those old stainless steel machines. We also had ice cream and served sundaes. Glass dishes were still in use and I had to wash them. Coffee was served in ceramic cups and pop was served in those paper cones that fitted into plastic holders. Pop wasn’t very popular because of the chintzy amount. That may have been acceptable in the past, but by the 1970’s, swigging out of bottles and cans had become the norm. I do remember making “cherry coke” by putting a little dipper of cherry syrup in the bottoim of the cup before filling it with coke. Green River was made sort of the same way – a dipper of syrup and filled with soda water. We had a little dispenser that measured out a dose of Bromo-Seltzer too. You’d give it to the customer along with a glass of water. I worked there after school and around 4:30 people would start congregating waiting for the Daily News finals to arrive. When they got there, I spent the next ten minutes ringing up dimes. I also did RX deliveries in the immediate neighborhood.

The independent drug store in m y own neighborhood was Elmdale Drugs at the corner of Clark street and Elmdale (Peterson). It kind of looked like LaManna’s only without the soda fountain. It was owned by two brothers named Kaplan and they remained open until they retired in the late 70’s. There was also a Rexall at Clark street and Granville but it was more modern and “franchise-y”.

Options: ReplyQuote

AD:

Re: Independent Pharmacies
Posted by: Steve B. (74.7.39.---)
Date: August 12, 2011 02:54PM

In the heart of the Back of the Yards neighborhood, we had Dubsky's Pharmacy on the northwest corner of 47th and Honore Streets. Besides prescription drugs, they sold some medical related items, but not much more than that. It appears to be a clothing store now; but the original mortar and pestle pharmacy icon in molded bas relief can be seen near the rooftop.
At 4500 S. Wood Street, there was Mankowski Drugs who also had a large newsstand and soda fountain complete with green enamel swivel stools. I bought all my Dell comic books there in the mid-50s. The first floor of the building is now a Hispanic grocery store.
Steve B.

Options: ReplyQuote

AD:

Re: Independent Pharmacies
Posted by: Kchi (---.dsl.chcgil.sbcglobal.net)
Date: August 13, 2011 11:10AM

Three pharmacies I remember, were Northwestern Pharmacy on the corner of Damen and Milwaukee, It wasn't the closest to my house but it was one of the few that was open 24 hours. In the 60s when many stores closed at 6:00 on Saturdays and were closed on Sundays, I remember many times running there for my parents because they had a tube tester. If they did not have the right tube, you were without TV for the whole weekend. They also did a good business with those waiting for the Damen Ave. bus which never seem to come. It also had the old fashioned wooden telephone booth and magazine display rack.

I also remember Okonski's pharmacy on the corner of Leavit and Shakespeare. As a kid I was fascinated by the old fashion Lifesavers display with all the rolls and the display case with all the old boxes of cigars.

A third pharmacy I remember was Adam's on Western Ave a couple of blocks south of Fullerton. My fascination there as a kid, is that is where I would go to buy Matchbox cars. They had one of those spiral displays with all the cars for sale.

Options: ReplyQuote

AD:

Re: Independent Pharmacies
Posted by: Mornac (---.dsl.chcgil.sbcglobal.net)
Date: August 13, 2011 12:47PM

Kchi Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> As a kid I was
> fascinated by the old fashion Lifesavers display
> with all the rolls

I'd forgotten about those things kchi. Seems that every drugstore, dimestore, newstand, or anyplace that sold candy had one of those.

Image error
File not found.
open image URL


On the north side we had a 24 hour pharmacy called "Muskett & Hendrickson". I don't know where it was at because I never actually saw it. I just know that when someone needed a prescription after hours, the name Muskett & Hendrickson invariably came into the conversation.

Options: ReplyQuote

AD:

Re: Independent Pharmacies
Posted by: Archer and Homan (---.hsd1.il.comcast.net)
Date: August 14, 2011 06:44PM

In Brighton Park, there was Wiertelak's Rexall on Archer and Spaulding. I remember buying baseball cards there.

My aunt also worked at Nudd-Para which was on 51st and Damen on the northeast corner. Our family doctor was located in the medical building next door.

There also was Dybas' drug store on 49th and Archer across the street from Curie High School and Curie Park.

Options: ReplyQuote

AD:

Re: Independent Pharmacies
Posted by: Richard Stachowski (---.dsl.chcgil.sbcglobal.net)
Date: August 14, 2011 11:24PM

Archer and Homan Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> In Brighton Park, there was Wiertelak's Rexall on
> Archer and Spaulding. I remember buying baseball
> cards there.
>
> My aunt also worked at Nudd-Para which was on 51st
> and Damen on the northeast corner. Our family
> doctor was located in the medical building next
> door.
>
> There also was Dybas' drug store on 49th and
> Archer across the street from Curie High School
> and Curie Park.

The doctor was Dr. Novak. I thought the drug store was Lesko Drugs. That was our doctor also. I lived on 50th & Wolcott across from cornell park. We lived therefrom 1944 to the 70's.

Options: ReplyQuote

AD:

Re: Independent Pharmacies
Posted by: logansquare60647 (---.hsd1.il.comcast.net)
Date: August 20, 2011 06:40AM

As a kid growing up in Peterson Park in the 80s, I think we were the very last generation to actually have neighborhood pharms. There were two in my neighborhood, Crane's, on Peterson and Bernard, and Mels, off of Pulaski and Devon. I remember going to Crain's to get packs of baseball cards, for 40 cents. Years later all packs of cards would cost $2 to $3! The packs of Tops with the gum in them! Left your cards smelling like bubblegum. And we'd get the fake candy cigarettes that you could puff smoke out of, wow, think that product would ever fly today? haha

Crains folded probably by 1990 or so, I think it's a laundry mat or something now, Mels I think lasted till about '95 or so, think it's a liquor store now or something.

I am glad though that I got to experience neighborhood pharmacies growing up. A long gone relic of city living.

Options: ReplyQuote

AD:

Re: Independent Pharmacies
Posted by: 222psm (---.br.br.cox.net)
Date: August 20, 2011 10:50AM

I remember the fake candy cigarettes, we thought we were so cool "smoking" those, and yes today they definitely would not fly. I grew up in the 70's-80's and at the time a lot of things that where common "back in the day" where slowly dying out, local drug stores, home milk delivery etc.

Options: ReplyQuote

AD:

Re: Independent Pharmacies
Posted by: Mornac (---.dsl.chcgil.sbcglobal.net)
Date: August 20, 2011 12:15PM

logansquare60647 Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> As a kid growing up in Peterson Park in the 80s, I
> think we were the very last generation to actually
> have neighborhood pharms. There were two in my
> neighborhood, Crane's, on Peterson and Bernard,
> and Mels, off of Pulaski and Devon.

For years I took note of Tarpy's drugs on the NE corner of Peterson ans Cicero whenever I drove out in that direction. It looked like a neighborhood pharmacy that wasn't going to die. They recently moved across Peterson to the street level of a modern office building. Do they figure into your history logansquare?

I'm guessing that the recently arrived Walgreens on Peterson sounded the death knell for many of the neighborhood pharmacies in the area.

Options: ReplyQuote

AD:

Re: Independent Pharmacies
Posted by: logansquare60647 (---.hsd1.il.comcast.net)
Date: August 23, 2011 02:58AM

Yeah Mornac, I used to go there time to time if I was out west. Wasn't really part of our lil neighborhood per se though. We'd venture that way if we were heading to Caldwell woods, but that's about it, not much to do in that direction for us kids at that time. One of my first jobs was nearby in one of the office buildings. Didn't realize they aren't there anymore, I don't get out that way much these days, my life is all east and/or south of logan sq now. I know they have the whole foods across the street now though. Used to be that car wash. At one time I remember reading I think in like Crain's or something that it was one of Chicago's hottest parcels, a few years back. With multiple companies bidding big bucks to get that corner. Whole Foods won out obviously.

Options: ReplyQuote

AD:

Re: Independent Pharmacies
Posted by: shekaago (---.sub-75-211-149.myvzw.com)
Date: September 02, 2011 01:01AM

Such great memories, everyone!

At the northeast corner of Belmont and Oak Park there was a Dwyer's Pharmacy and on the southwest corner, if my memory is correct, there was a Rexall Drugstore. Another Rexall was located on the nothwest corner of Belmont and Austin. I also remember the name "Muskett & Hendrickson" but don't know exactly where it was located.

Options: ReplyQuote

AD:

:)-DRe: Independent Pharmacies
Posted by: jimysohns (---.hsd1.il.comcast.net)
Date: January 12, 2013 03:37AM

My Dad Harry Adams owned Adams Drugs on Belden and Western until he died in 1970. Frank Horwitz bought it after that and owned it for many years.

Options: ReplyQuote

AD:

Re: Independent Pharmacies
Posted by: jak378 (---.hsd1.fl.comcast.net)
Date: January 12, 2013 02:15PM

In my old neighborhood, in the early 50's, we had at least 3 pharmacies. Wagreens on the northeast corner of 55th and Ashland; K and K on the southwest corner of 55th and Ashland and a Rexall, which was a franchise and the name escapes me on the northeast corner of 57th and Ashland. I believe that the Walgreens had a soda fountain but I never went in there much. K and K had an old sod fountain that was only used to make shakes and malts, The rest of was deactivated. I don't ever remember anyone working there other than the 2 Pharmacists who looked enough alike to be brothers. They must have used the same foumula for the shakes and malst because they wer delicious, no matter who made them. I have never had any that were better. The Rexall had an abandoned soda fountain in the back. All of them had the folding door phone booths with the little seat.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 01/13/2013 12:33PM by jak378.

Options: ReplyQuote

AD:

Re: Independent Pharmacies
Posted by: fleurblue (---.proxy.aol.com)
Date: January 13, 2013 01:58AM

Keystone Drugs on Milwaukee and Pulaski was the nearest store to our house. In addition to the pharmacy, there was a large display floor with most of the things you might find at Walgreens and a mini gift shop. They usually carried things we couldn't find elsewhere in the neighborhood.

Options: ReplyQuote

AD:

Re: Independent Pharmacies
Posted by: shoreline (---.hsd1.il.comcast.net)
Date: January 17, 2013 02:04PM

@mornac,
Musket and Henrikson was one of the few 24 hour pharmacies up north during the 60s/70s. It was located at the northeast corner of Main and Crawford in Skokie until at least the 1980s.Like all the others it was probably killed off by the chains.

Options: ReplyQuote

AD:

Re: Independent Pharmacies
Posted by: Dunning1 (---.dhs.gov)
Date: January 17, 2013 04:12PM

Sheekago--I think the other pharmacy at Belmont & Oak Park was Marcoe Pharmacy. Right next to it was a little snack shop called Cheerio. Bruce & Ken's Pharmacy on Addison Street was a long time fixture, and they ultimately had several branches. The store finally closed up in the late 1990's, with Bruce becoming a pharmacist at the Dominick's pharmacy that used to be in the store at Forest Preserve Drive and Harlem. When that ultimately closed down, all of the prescriptions were moved to the store in River Grove.
Musket & Hendriksen Pharmacy was also a chain. The branch you must remember was on Central and Berteau, the building still exists as a dance school. When I was in high school, my friend's mother worked as a waitress in the snack shop in the Musket & Hendriksen that was located on Oak Street, just west of Michigan Avenue. We were allowed to come in just before closing, and get the "mistakes," or orders that were returned to the kitchen..for free. I was always fascinated by the two large footed bottles of colored water, red and green, that were always by the drug dispensing part of the drug store. I remember, as a young child, our family doctor was in the Tiffin Theater building near North Avenue and Pulaski. I remember going into the drug store there, and always seeing those bottles, wondering what they were for.

Options: ReplyQuote

AD:

Pages: 1234Next
Current Page: 1 of 4


Home | Columns | Articles | Features | Links | Forum | Mission Statement | Staff | Media & Press | Maps | FAQ | Contact