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8 years ago
Mikey
I agree with you 100%. It's too bad that the feelings in this country were what they were at the time. The actors and acting on that program were some of the best, and the show was fun to watch. Never was a critical complaint heard about how dumb the Honeymooner characters were, in spite of the shows running almost concurrently. I guess it was just a bad time in our history. I'm proud to say
Forum: General Discussion
8 years ago
Mikey
In re: Amos & Andy on TV: Wonderful show, with seasoned actors. Problem was that some leaders of the African-American community pulled the plug on the show around 1965 because they believed that it portrayed African-Americans in a "bad light" and made them look like idiots or something to that effect. What about two of the biggest "idiot" chracters on TV at that time, Ra
Forum: General Discussion
9 years ago
Mikey
This one's really off the wall, but in the 1960s there was a place at 4667 N. Francisco, 3 doors from the tracks, called Plate Blocks, Inc. Their business was the sale of blocks of stamps to collectors. Mikey
Forum: Forgotten Chicago Sightings
9 years ago
Mikey
> go downtown on the weekends in the 60's. We'd take the IC (Illinois Central) from 119th & Halsted to the Randolph Street Station. That's the Metra Electric nowadays. We'd go to Abercrombe & Fitch's (to see all the new contraptions they had), Kroch & Brentano's The reason that I seem to remember this cafeteria-style "automat" being on South Wabash is because I, too vis
Forum: General Discussion
9 years ago
Mikey
> It was located at 64 W. Madison Street. It existed until it had a fatal fire of 3 > firemen in Jan, 1973. It was a 2 level cafeteria style restaurant. Wow. Sad to hear that. Thanx for the info. The one I remember was definitely on Wabash, so it wasn't Pixley's. Now I'm straining my brain to try to remember the name of the one I used to eat at. I'm almost positive it was around 100 (mayb
Forum: General Discussion
9 years ago
Mikey
I don't remember The Forum, but I do remember an "Automat"-style cafeteria on the East side of Wabash around Madison or Washington street. I believe it was Pixley and Ehlers. It was similar to the New York-style place caled Horn and Hardart. Mike
Forum: General Discussion
10 years ago
Mikey
Regarding street-name changes: 1. I believe the changing of many street names results from public pressure, because it takes a lot of work and money to make said changes; also, as stated earlier, the cost to each family and/or business affected by the change can be enormous. I remember when the big fight over Pulaski finally ended, around 1952. But some folks who live in my old neighborhood aro
Forum: Forgotten Chicago Sightings
10 years ago
Mikey
Beautiful! Thanks! Mikey
Forum: Forgotten Chicago Sightings
10 years ago
Mikey
RJ, Timber Lanes must have been there prior to the "mid"-70s, because I bowled on a league there in 1971-72, when I worked for Dynascan Corp. (which eventually became Cobra Electronics) on Belle Plaine. Nice place! Mikey
Forum: General Discussion
10 years ago
Mikey
Hey, Way Out! You caught me with my memory down. ;-) I remember that place being at Dearborn and Harrison, but was I off a mile! Well, maybe not that far, but even that itty bitty error of 200 feet is embarassing, as I probably walked past the place 100 times, and even ate there (once!). But that "memorial" is cool! The buildings along the 1/4 mile long 600-800 block of Dearborn
Forum: General Discussion
10 years ago
Mikey
Gman: Not a problem. And I'm sure if I hadn't posted that, my friend FranCarmen would have. She's the expert on that neighborhood. ;-) Mikey
Forum: General Discussion
10 years ago
Mikey
The AP branch at Kimball? Unreal! I just drove past that intersection a month ago, and hadn't noticed! Thanx for the info. Sad to see the place go. When I was growing up in AP, I'd go to the location prior to that one, which was on the north side of Lawrence ave. halfway bewtween Drake and Central Park. Mikey
Forum: General Discussion
10 years ago
Mikey
...and as I just mentioned a few minutes ago on another thread here, Adam's Apple, around 6200 N. California, a head shop that still looks the same as it did 45+ years ago and still carries 60s and 70s fashions, like bell-bottoms. Mikey
Forum: General Discussion
10 years ago
Mikey
Gotta reply to Gman's comment about Zfaney's Pharmacy. It was at the northeast corner of Kimball and Foster, diagonal from the new Albany Park Library. The one at Kimball and Lawrence was an old Rexall called Fischoff's. Mikey (Albany Parker forever!)
Forum: General Discussion
10 years ago
Mikey
One place I'll NEVER forget was a diner at the SE corner of Dearborn and Harrison called Tom's Diner. It was the greasy spoon to end all greasy spoons. When I was in elementary school in the 50s my dad would let me accompany him on service calls in the Loop, when school was out. He took me in there for a burger ONCE and that was all I could handle. He said that most people referred to it as "
Forum: General Discussion
10 years ago
Mikey
In re Jeff Weiner and Lance Grey's comment about Bizarre Bazaar: I'm pretty sure "Bizarre Bazaar" was the correct spelling. I remember the wealth of head shops and hippie colthing stores on Wells street in Old Town. Practically lived down there in the late 60s. But: good news for you aging hippies! I had a very pleasant surprise a few weeks back, as I was tooling around in the Califor
Forum: General Discussion
10 years ago
Mikey
Regarding the "UFO House" on Dee Road - I lived in NW Park Ridge for a long time, and in 1986-87 I lived in the Dee / NW Highway area. Never a week went by that I didn't pass that house and find a few dressing trailers parked there. I figured there was filming going on, due to the nature of the house's design. I have the MLS sheet from Baird & Warner Realtors (1987) for the place. It
Forum: General Discussion
10 years ago
Mikey
Sorry if I'm way off base here, but I'd like to take a stab at this. I seem to remember back a bunch of years ago that there was a little red "school house" at the north end of Edens Parkway, where it makes a sharp turn to the left and becomes Bryn Mawr avenue. Could this be the place in question? I know it hasn't been there in quite some time, but when I lived in Forest Glen 35 years
Forum: Forgotten Chicago Sightings
10 years ago
Mikey
I wonder if Wimpy's is still around? Time to Google. ;-) Speaking of burger chains, I still remember hanging out at Henry's (Lincolnwood, on Lincoln north of Devon) back in the early-to-mid 1960s. Their hamburgers were similar to Mickey D's, but seemed a bit saltier. Maybe it was just my imagination. Mikey
Forum: General Discussion
10 years ago
Mikey
To: Holtanek That's a tough one... but I seem to remember Susan of Susan's Show sitting in a large, cushy chair at times. Could that have been it? Some of the characters on the show, such as Mr. Pegasus, had strange powers, and maybe one of them was the ability to levitate things. Maybe he levitated Susan? ;-) Mikey
Forum: General Discussion
10 years ago
Mikey
Have to mention the craziest one of all: Soupy Sales, in the late 50s. I give my vote to Soupy for being the zaniest guy on kids' TV. His puppets White Fang, Black Tooth, Hippy and Pookie were wonderful. He'd have Pookie and Hippy "lip-synching" to popular tunes, and many of them were jazz, as Sales was a HUGE jazz lover. They would also "mouth" the words to Stan Freberg parody
Forum: General Discussion
10 years ago
Mikey
I almost never missed Superman on TV. Aside, when I saw the first Superman movie, I was excited to see Noel Neill (Lois Lane) on the train near the beginning of the film. Never watched Uncle Johnny. I've only seen pictures of him wearing a pith helmet. Your mention of Andy Starr also brings back warm fuzzy memories. Couldn't wait to get home from school to watch that show, with the Stooges a
Forum: General Discussion
10 years ago
Mikey
Regarding Wyoming Ed's mention of "Garfield Goose": a couple of things come to mind. The first is that along with Garfield and Christmas Goose, Romberg Rabbit, and Beauregard Burnside the Third, there was a very important little mouse named McIntosh, whose name would go down in history as the world's first pointing device for a computer. So, Apple was NOT the first to have a McIntosh Mou
Forum: General Discussion
10 years ago
Mikey
Yeah, we were pretty busy playing 16" Chicago-style softball and tag, etc. But in our younger days there were so many great kid's shows... Romper Room, Susan's Show, Elmer the Elepahnt, Super Circus (with Claude Kirschner, and that majorette, I think was Mary Hartline). The zoo show was "Zoo Parade", with Marlin Perkins, who, at the time, ran the Lincoln Park Zoo. Then came Bozo, wh
Forum: General Discussion
10 years ago
Mikey
Kukla, Fran and Ollie provided me with my earliest memories of television in Chicago. Burr Tillstrom was the puppeteer. I stumbled across a bust statue of him in a park in, of all places, Saugatuck, Michigan! I guess he was born there. The children's show mentioned by querencia ("take me home...) was called "Susan's Show". The girl was Susan Heinkel, and I had a huge crush on her
Forum: General Discussion
10 years ago
Mikey
I seem to remember a Wimpy's on State st. near Randolph, next to that store where you could buy just about anything (the Treasure Chest?). The Dill Pickle... makes my mouth water just thinking about their corned beef sandwiches. Closest thing to that (outside of Manny's, of course) is a place called the Onion Roll at 7000 west North avenue. A couple of Italian brothers designed the place to be
Forum: General Discussion
10 years ago
Mikey
In re: Little Al's Records, which was at about 3230 W. Lawrence, I have "fond" memories of that place. Al and his wife (?) were always fighting and cursing each other across the front of the store. It was a riot to hear the fights. Used to go there every week to pick up a copy of the Silver Dollar Survey sheet (Top 40). The front of the (double-) store was always plastered with dozens
Forum: General Discussion
10 years ago
Mikey
Dating old maps with Roman numerals isn't such a bad thing. I'd rather have to use them than have to use map companies' crazy codes to decipher the year. Here's the site for decoding map dates: http://roadmaps.org/map-information/dating-rand-mcnally-and-gousha-maps/ Mikey
Forum: Questions and Answers (Q&A)
10 years ago
Mikey
Hi. Sorry to be so late with this post, but I'm a newbie still catching up on my reading. ;-) If it's any help, the J. H. Colton 1855 Chicago map shows all east-west streets (it only goes as far as 2100 south) as NAMES rather than numbers; in fact, only Twelfth Street is "numbered", if you could call it that. Mikey
Forum: General Discussion
10 years ago
Mikey
In the 60s, as far back as I can remember, Waukegan stopped at Touhy, about 200 feet east of Milwaukee ave. There's a waterfall there now. However, if you jogged over about 200 feet to the east, the street that WOULD HAVE BEEN Waukegan Road kept going south, into St. Adalbert's Cemetery. I remember it being Newark Ave., but prior to that it was known as Evergreen Ave. (in the 1950s). It was blocke
Forum: General Discussion
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