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14 years ago
paw
Do either of the yellow signs independently mark am existing street?
Forum: General Discussion
14 years ago
paw
Agreed, Yeah the trains were so bad on Archer and Cicero the CTA buses would reroute to 47th when I was on them after waiting half an hour.
Forum: Forgotten Chicago Sightings
14 years ago
paw
It was two distinctly different metal designs. one was like Ashland, one covered.
Forum: Forgotten Chicago Sightings
14 years ago
paw
Would seem to need the central one more since the overpass exists on Harlem.
Forum: Forgotten Chicago Sightings
14 years ago
paw
I never use it but I just went over the Ashland Canal bridge on Google and that is kind of the design I am talking about. It was definitely on Damen ands one other street. Maybe Kedzie had the style shown in trolleybus and the Asland style cause Damen had both I beleive.
Forum: Forgotten Chicago Sightings
14 years ago
paw
On a side note, In Ursula Bielski's Chicago Haunts book she states that the the girl she believes to be the inspiration for the Resurrection Mary story was killed in a car accident on Old Harlem and 68th while crossing the railroad tracks.
Forum: Forgotten Chicago Sightings
14 years ago
paw
My question is when did the overpass come in? It looked like the old street still went through even after the overpass was built in some old maps.
Forum: Forgotten Chicago Sightings
14 years ago
paw
BTW another great page, can't wait for Bridges!!
Forum: General Discussion
14 years ago
paw
The only trailer park is in the far southeast side I think.
Forum: General Discussion
14 years ago
paw
Yes I actually took the old harlem spur the other day and it goes from 64th to 68th unconnected to Harlem now. You can also see the old route of the street where it went through it is a dirt path.
Forum: Forgotten Chicago Sightings
14 years ago
paw
Gullikson is actually a street that existed back in the 1930's and was cut down to its present size.
Forum: Forgotten Chicago Sightings
14 years ago
paw
Wow that is different than I remember. I wonder if there was an interim design. Or if the other bridge was not Kedzie either. Same idea though.
Forum: Forgotten Chicago Sightings
14 years ago
paw
So what are the other offices features now besides the furniture shop?
Forum: General Discussion
14 years ago
paw
It is shades on the 1910 map between Halsted and vine it currently only runs half that length there. It is also called stark over by sedgewick and concord over by clybourn
Forum: General Discussion
14 years ago
paw
I'm guessing the curvy designs were Kedzie and Damen. Anyone remember them? Are there any other bridges left like them?
Forum: Forgotten Chicago Sightings
14 years ago
paw
Hey one day we'll be saying this about white hen's.
Forum: General Discussion
14 years ago
paw
Then the name just sort of disappears before 30. Kind of random.
Forum: General Discussion
14 years ago
paw
It's amazing there is a map of movie theaters on the Encyclopedia of Chicago that shows the decline of movie theaters in Chicago. There were 100's of theaters in the 1930's and now there are 29. probably a lot of lost treasures.
Forum: Forgotten Chicago Sightings
14 years ago
paw
Maybe the picture was more directly south of the mall than the Radar tower, but that would be weird having two abandoned structures like that in such close proximity and people only remembering one.
Forum: General Discussion
14 years ago
paw
Didn't the canal bridge used to have a curvy metal design spanning both sides. Was this removed? Or was that at Kedzie? I know the old Damen canal bridge had it before being rebuilt.
Forum: Forgotten Chicago Sightings
14 years ago
paw
Okay this is only a theory. having looked at the picture and the maps and with some recollection of the old mall. i would have to guess that was the old radar tower in the picture. The tracks would go through the brickyard so there would be debris west of the tracks. it wasnt Oak Park but probably two blocks east. Also, it is interesting to note that looking at the old air photo that Grand Ave was
Forum: General Discussion
14 years ago
paw
I don't, but you are correct Major is an alley that serves only to connect to 57th and it certainly wouldn't seem that the houses would predate the railroad. There is an even odder house in an alley directly north two blocks, but it is literally in an alley and it has an address that is posted on a wooden sign on 56 th street as I wrote about previously. This house seems to be an old farmhouse and
Forum: Forgotten Chicago Sightings
14 years ago
paw
In fact one of the first movies I ever attended was at the Marquette theater on 63rd and Kedzie right by the Colony and I believe it was ran by the same people. "The Marquette was owned the same chain that owned the Hi-Way and the Colony theatres. On the north side of the city they owned the Sheridan, Patio, Vogue, North Center and possibly some others." from a post on Cinematreasure
Forum: Forgotten Chicago Sightings
14 years ago
paw
Wish they could have saved!cinematreasures.org/theater/2527/
Forum: Forgotten Chicago Sightings
14 years ago
paw
What is really cool about the street names is that they all exist on the border of kankakee and will counties with the numbering system in tact. 32649 S. Kedzie is the highest one I've seen.
Forum: General Discussion
14 years ago
paw
I would have to guess one of the shortest streets in Chicago ( with houses on it would be 57th place between Major and the alley behind Massasoit 1/4 block like 3 houses on each side.
Forum: Forgotten Chicago Sightings
14 years ago
paw
Can you see that from Ogden?
Forum: General Discussion
14 years ago
paw
A bit off topic. Another classic area on Ogden were the old steel bridges in Cicero. They were where Ogden, 26th, and Cicero meet
Forum: General Discussion
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