The Loop in the late 50s on a Sunday


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The Loop in the late 50s on a Sunday
Posted by: fleurblue (---.proxy.aol.com)
Date: August 02, 2009 05:12PM

My folks would take us downtown once or twice in the summer on Sundays. I remember that none of the big stores were open and the Loop was fairly quiet.

There were some junk stores on Randolph with tables full of stuff set outside. (early sidewalk sales?).

There was a theater on State (I think it was the Loop) that still featured newsreels (black and white posters outside with pictures of soldiers). I couldn't image anyone going to the movies to see news.

I do remember having lunch at Henrici's and Toffenitti's. Henrici's with it's white tile floor and dark wood tables (I think). And Toffenitti's with it's seemingly mile-long lunch counter.

Street photographers stood in front of most downtown theaters and snapped your photo as you walked by. They handed you a numbered envelope to mail back with money for the shot and your name and address. They promised to mail a photo back. We never did send one in. Did anyone?

I have to say, those guys were very persistent salesmen.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 10/18/2009 02:35AM by fleurblue.

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Re: The Loop in the late 50s on a Sunday
Posted by: querencia (---.dsl.chcgil.sbcglobal.net)
Date: September 28, 2009 11:45PM

For those not old enough to remember, Toffenetti's Triangle Restaurant was where Borders Books now is at Randolph & Washington, facing on Randolph. They had certain dishes that they prepared in the window, according to season---I remember strawberry shortcake in the springtime and big huge baked Idaho potatoes in the winter. Wait a minute, I have an old guidebook to Chicago and will look it up:
"Triangle Restaurant, 57 W Randolph...They specialize in ham and sweets, Idaho baked potatoes, and strawberry shortcake [what did I tell you?]...Open 24 hours daily. B 25cents to 85 cents, Lun 45 cents to 95 cents, Din 70 cents to $2.00". ("Where to Eat and Sleep in Chicagoland", Marie C Pedderson, 1947)

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Re: The Loop in the late 50s on a Sunday
Posted by: [email protected] (---.hsd1.il.comcast.net)
Date: May 24, 2014 12:53AM

I worked at Toffenettis on Randolph street in the early 1950s as an elevator girl plus hostess. This restaurant had 3 floors...the main floor mostly large U shaped counters. The second floor was a real dining room with white table cloths....last came the third floor which was a Mens Grill. Yes this was allowed then & we were close to city hall so had many men who worked there as regulars. I loved this job & we were treated very well by Dario Toffenetti & allowed a meal before starting work plus another during our meal break. We were allowed to eat anything on the menu except shrimp or steak. I gained a lot of weight while working there as they also had delicious pies as well as the ever popular strawberry shortcake. Dario obviously remembered his humble beginnings as he treated all his help as he would family or friends. This job was a happy memory.

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Re: Toffenettis Restaurant on Randolph St.
Posted by: [email protected] (---.hsd1.il.comcast.net)
Date: May 24, 2014 12:55AM

I worked at Toffenettis on Randolph street in the early 1950s as an elevator girl plus hostess. This restaurant had 3 floors...the main floor mostly large U shaped counters. The second floor was a real dining room with white table cloths....last came the third floor which was a Mens Grill. Yes this was allowed then & we were close to city hall so had many men who worked there as regulars. I loved this job & we were treated very well by Dario Toffenetti & allowed a meal before starting work plus another during our meal break. We were allowed to eat anything on the menu except shrimp or steak. I gained a lot of weight while working there as they also had delicious pies as well as the ever popular strawberry shortcake. Dario obviously remembered his humble beginnings as he treated all his help as he would family or friends. This job was a happy memory.

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